Kara's Critter Care, LLC

Subtitle

Blog

Why cats and dogs don't always get along.

Posted on June 21, 2015 at 10:40 PM Comments comments (0)


Cats and Dogs.

Ever wonder why cant and dogs seem to hate each other?  Cats have a very different way of using body language than dogs do, so much of the trouble comes from miscommunication.  Misreading the other species can lead to an attack on either end.  Here are some examples of how the body language differs.


Tail Height:

For cats, a high tail means they are friendly, relaxed, and confident.  High with fur puffed out can mean alarm and aggression.  The tail being low usually means they are unsure or fearful.

For dogs, a high tail usually means arousal and possible aggression.  If the dog is agitated the tail may flick back and forth vigorously.  Neutral position (differs by breed) means they are relaxed.

Wagging Tail: 

For cats, a wagging tail is seen in an unfriendly encounter and the cat may attack.

     For dogs, a loose wag at medium height is a friendly dog.  (Note, not all tail wags in a dog equal a friendly dog).

Closed Mouth:

For cats, a closed mouth is a relaxed cat.

For dogs, a closed mouth or partially opened mouth can be a relaxed dog, however a tightly closed mouth means the dog is tense.  

Ears:

For cats, ears forward means the cat is confident and if the ears are backwards the cat is uncertain and a greeting is not going well.

For dogs, forward ears may be a dog standing his ground, ears slightly back is a friendly dog, and ears all the way back is a fearful or submissive dog.

Turning to side:

For cats, they may try to look bigger so they are threatening.

For dogs, they are trying to show they are no threat.

Belly Up:

For cats, this is a self defense position with all 4 paws ready and the cat will attack.

For dogs, this is usually a submissive position or the dog just wants a belly rub.


Even though these differences

can cause confusion, there are

still some similarities in body

language.

a)  Ears:  All the way forward if there is excitement or interest and all the way back for fear.

b)  Hackles:  Up when frightened, overstimulated, and ready to react.

c)  Eyes:  Pupil dilation shows fear or aggression. Blinking shows         peaceful greeting.  A direct stare is a threat.

d)   Compacted body: Appear small and tail tucked when scared.

e)  Stiff whiskers:  Stimulated and ready to react.

f)  Panting:  Heavy panting can be from a stressed or frightened animal. When a cat is not communicating, see a vet while panting heavily.

g)  Yawning:  A calming behavior in conflict situations.  


          

By: Kara Zapko

https://www.pinterest.com/karazapko/" target="_blank">http://https://www.pinterest.com/karazapko/


Found on vetstreet

The dog's tail is wagging, must be friendly...not always.

Posted on February 23, 2015 at 8:40 PM Comments comments (0)

What does the dog's tail really mean?

Many people believe that a dog that is wagging it's tail must be friendly.  This is a common misconception that unfortunately leads to a bite sometimes.

Tail positions have different meanings.  

 

  1. High tail:  A dog that is carrying a high tail can mean the dog is feeling confident, powerful, secure, or dominant.  This high carriage also allows the dog's scent to be exposed.  
  2. Horizontal to the ground:  Not submissive or dominant.  Might be more curious.  A slow moving tail at this height may mean the dog is feeling insecure.
  3. Between the legs: Submissive or fearful.  This also covers the dog's scent to go unnoticed.
  4. Relaxed:  Tail in natural position for the breed.
  5. Happy:  Usually in relaxed position but moves side to side,  the faster it goes, the more excited the dog is.  A happy dog's tail may even go in a circular pattern.
  6. Alert/Aroused:  Tail higher than normal and stiff.  The dog may be threatening and standing it's ground with a high, stiff tail that is moving rigidly.  This usually gives the appearance of a vibrating tail and is an active threat.
  7. There is also evidence that a tail that is swinging more to the right is a happy dog and a tail that is swinging more to the left is an unhappy dog.

It is very important to read the whole dog.  The dog uses the entire body to portray different meanings.  A tail wag that is accompanied by a stiff body, dilated pupils, and ears pushed forward or backwards is a dog you don't want to mess with.  
 By: Kara Zapko


Image and info found on Psycholoy Today.